Terpenes CBD Oil Review

What are terpenes? This 2022 cannabis, marijuana enthusiast's guide to terpenes will walk you through these fragrant, medicinal and mystical compounds. Wondering what terpenes are and what their role in CBD oil is? In this article, we cover the most commonly found terpenes in CBD products, explain their therapeutic properties, and their contribution to the entourage effect. Are you looking for a CBD oil high in terpenes? Green Roads has a great selection. Read this in-depth review to find out if they’re right for you.

What are Terpenes?

Here’s The Deal:
One of the most fun aspects of being a cannabis consumer or patient is the ability to smell the array of fragrances that the plant’s flowers produce. With scents ranging from fruity aromas to cheese-like smells, the cannabis plant can require the consumer to develop a level of familiarity and expertise with its unique makeup. So what exactly is behind these fragrances that trigger such connections? And what is it that makes them so unique?

You Had Me at Fragrance
You may have heard of terpenes or terpenoids, the chemical that gives cannabis its different types of scents. Terpenes are organic hydrocarbons found in the essential oils of plants. With the rise of the legal cannabis industry, the discussion around terpenes has recently heated up. We’re here to break down what these chemicals are, and exactly what they are doing to make your cannabis experience so unique.

What’s In a Name?
First, the words terpenes and terpenoids are often used interchangeably, although the meanings do vary. Terpenes are the naturally occurring combination of carbon and hydrogen, whereas terpenoids are terpenes that have been modified through a drying and curing process (chemical modification), altering the oxygen content of the compound.

Can you guess where pinene is commonly found? That’s right — pine trees. Pinene actually comes in two types: alpha, which smells like pine needles and is the most commonly found terpene in nature, and beta, which smells like rosemary, basil, dill, or parsley. Pinene is also found in conifer trees, citrus peels, and turpentine. Pinene is a powerful bronchodilator, which helps improve airflow to lungs, making it a good option for those struggling with asthma.

  • Blue Dream
  • Island Sweet Skunk
  • Strawberry Cough

Linalool is commonly found in lavender and its aroma is light and floral. Widely known for the ability to reduce stress, linalool is used as an anti-anxiety, antidepressant, and sedative. Linalool is also used to relieve seizure symptoms and provide relief to those suffering from psychosis.

  • Amnesia Haze
  • LA Confidential
  • Purple Kush

Commonly found in mangoes, hops, thyme, and lemongrass, myrcene is said to be one of the most abundant terpenes in cannabis. Myrcene is important because its presence determines whether a strain is indica or sativa. According to Steep Hill Labs, if a plant has more than 0.5% myrcene, it will produce indica-like effects. Anything less than 0.5% myrcene produces sativa-like effects. Myrcene is also known for its antibiotic, analgesic, and anti-mutagenic properties.

  • Mango Kush
  • Blackberry Kush

Caryophyllene is known for its many healing properties. It’s a neuroprotectant (protects the brain and nervous system), pain reliever, and bacteria inhibitor. It also reduces chronic inflammation and can relieve symptoms of depression and anxiety. According to the American Association of Cancer Research, caryophyllene processes cancer-fighting properties.

  • OG Kush
  • Skywalker OG
  • Chem Dawg

Do you know what terpene a lemon scent refers to? Limonene. Limonene is not only characteristic of citrus-smelling cannabis but it’s also the exact terpene found in lemons and other citrus fruit rinds, like oranges and limes, giving them that fruity smell. Among other products, limonene is commonly used as a fragrant additive in cosmetics and cleaning supplies. Limonene also has antifungal and antibacterial properties.

  • Super Lemon Haze
  • Durban Poison
  • Jack Herer

Trichomes and Terpenes, What you Need to Know
In cannabis, terpenes are made in the trichomes of the plant. Trichomes are the shiny, sticky, mushroom-shaped crystals that cover the leaves and buds. Trichomes on cannabis act as a defense mechanism in nature, protecting the plant from insects and animals through the production of fragrant terpenes that repel these dangers. As humans, we smell these terpenes and can make inferences about the strain and possibly physiological effects that the strain may have.

Cannabis is an incredibly diverse plant regarding its biological makeup and potential benefits — and terpenes – are no exception. There are over 100 different identified terpenes in the cannabis plant, and while the differences can be subtle, much progress has been made in making classification of terpenes and their effects easy for patients and consumers to understand. Broadly, terpenes can be broken down into sweet, sour, spicy, or bitter — with each category further breaking down into more specific smells. These specific smells consist with certain strains, which in turn correlate to the effects of that plant. In fact, to help with this., many companies have produced terpene wheels to better help people understand this. More on that in a bit.

How Terpenes Affect your Mood
Here’s an example: A sour-smelling flower may have a strong lemon scent to it. Lemon scented strains are often correlated with strains like lemon skunk or lemon haze; these are zesty sativas that give the consumer a boost of energy and euphoria. With a better understanding of terpenes and how they relate to the scents that you are experiencing, you are able to come to certain conclusions about the plant in front of you by simply smelling it. This is powerful information for consumers, patients, and growers alike.

So what exactly are these terpenes?

Common Terpenes You May Already Be Familiar With

Limonene

You may be more familiar with terpenes than you realize. Considering our lemon example above, do you know what terpene a lemon scent refers to? Limonene. Limonene is not only characteristic of citrus-smelling cannabis but it’s also the exact terpene found in lemons and other citrus fruit rinds, like oranges and limes, giving them that fruity smell. Among other products, limonene is commonly used as a fragrant additive in cosmetics and cleaning supplies.

Limonene is known for its powerful antifungal and antibacterial properties. It’s a natural insecticide on the cannabis plant and can even assist in treating toenail fungus in humans. Limonene is easily absorbed through inhalation and even improves absorption of other terpenes through the skin and body tissue, like mucous membranes and the digestive tract. Limonene is also known for its stress-relieving and mood-enhancing effects.

Pinene

Can you guess where pinene is commonly found? That’s right — pine trees. Pinene actually comes in two types: alpha, which smells like pine needles and is the most commonly found terpene in nature, and beta, which smells like rosemary, basil, dill, or parsley. Pinene is also found in conifer trees, citrus peels, and turpentine. Pinene is a powerful bronchodilator, which helps improve airflow to lungs, making it a good option for those struggling with asthma. It’s also an anti-inflammatory and local antiseptic and has been used by cultures around the world for its healing properties for thousands of years. Pinene easily crosses the blood-brain barrier improving memory and alertness. It’s even said that pinene counters memory loss associated with THC.

Myrcene

Commonly found in mangoes, hops, thyme, and lemongrass, myrcene is said to be one of the most abundant terpenes in cannabis. Myrcene is important because its presence determines whether a strain is indica or sativa. According to Steep Hill Labs, if a plant has more than 0.5% myrcene, it will produce indica-like effects. Anything less than 0.5% myrcene produces sativa-like effects. Myrcene is also known for its antibiotic, analgesic, and anti-mutagenic properties.

Linalool

Linalool is commonly found in lavender and its aroma is light and floral. Widely known for the ability to reduce stress, linalool is used as an anti-anxiety, antidepressant, and sedative. Linalool is also used to relieve seizure symptoms and provide relief to those suffering from psychosis.

Custom Terpene Profiles

Research and information about terpenes are becoming increasingly available as interest in cannabis continues to grow. However, the average cannabis shopper can still be unaware of the effects that terpenes have on their cannabis experience. Furthermore, testing profiles showing cannabinoid and terpene content are not widely available to consumers. Companies are stepping in to remediate this by rebranding how we talk about terpenes.

Profile charts, like this table or this wheel, provide an easy, visual way for consumers and patients to understand which terpenes produce particular effects. Generally, terpenes can be associated with different strains or products. These visual aids can help educate curious consumers so that informed purchasing decisions can be made.

The Future of Cannabis is in Delivering a Consistent Feeling, Like This..
Recently, there has been an uptick in companies who discuss their products based on feelings. Some brands advertise solely based on their intended effects. You can now buy a vape pen labeled “relax” or “energy.” This is a game changer for a few reasons. Two customers may walk into a dispensary asking for something sativa. The first customer may ask for a sativa seeking to focus, while the other may ask for a sativa seeking higher levels of energy. Because varied terpene content within sativa strains will make certain products better for certain effects, the use of mood-based branding provides solutions for different types of customers.

Custom Terpene Profiles, Should I Care?
Custom terpene profiles can also be beneficial to patients seeking relief. Medical cannabis patients often suffer from several ailments at the same time, for example, nausea, pain, and stress. The severity and sensitivity of conditions vary among patients making individual, customized treatment essential. As more brands hit the market with custom terpene and cannabinoid profiles, patients are provided with increased treatment options, and in ways that we have not seen before. Because growing conditions and plant genetics determine terpene quality and content, growers are now able to make adjustments to the “how” and “what” they grow, in order to meet patient demand. This is a much faster and transparent process than waiting for a new pharmaceutical drug to hit the market.

See also  CBD Oil Candle

Terpenes and Vaporizing

Because terpenes have different molecular structures, their boiling points vary. The temperature at which you vaporize becomes important for understanding what produces your desired effects. Some compounds require higher boiling points to turn into vapor, while others are ineffective at high temperatures. The same goes for cannabinoids.

Love Terpenes? Pick your Vaporizer Wisely, Here’s Why
The differences can also be quite wide. For example, THC’s boiling point is 315 F and Linalool’s boiling point is 388 F. There is a multitude of vaporizers on the market and temperature customization is becoming increasingly popular. Many devices now let you change the temperature directly on the device or through a smartphone app, providing cannabis consumers with options to consume at different temperatures.

Smoking anything isn’t ideal for your body — combustion creates smoke which contains by-products that are harsh on your lungs. Vaporizing is more gentle on the body, and more of the vapor content is made of the cannabinoids and terpenes that you seek. Cannabinoids begin to vaporize at 285 F and combustion begins at 392 F. Playing with different temperatures will help you find your sweet spot.

Non-Cannabis Terpenes and Concentrates

Another trend gaining popularity is the rise in products combining non-cannabis, isolated terpenes, and concentrates. A recent Brazilian study found that rats exposed to this combination were more likely to develop kidney problems than rats exposed to either substance on their own. Their research found that cannabis smoke degraded isolated beta-caryophyllene (another common terpene) into toxic chemicals known for consumption. The authors of the study went so far as to advise against mixing these compounds for humans.

More scientific research is necessary in order to better understand how terpenes affect the human body. Cannabis Science is still a relatively new field and there is so much more to be discovered. Until then, you can learn more by educating yourself on what research has been validated in order to better inform your consumption and purchasing decisions.

Your Most Important Takeaways about Terpenes

From what we know, the potential benefits from terpenes are promising. These organic, naturally occurring compounds not only enhance and inform your cannabis experience but also offer great medicinal benefits to patients. Terpenes have been used for thousands of years by cultures around the world for their healing properties and as cannabis science expands, the possibilities to help more people becomes increasingly exciting.

Bottom Line:
Terpene-based products are pushing the conversation about these compounds into the mainstream. Consumers are beginning to understand the correlation between terpenes and cannabinoids and their cannabis-consumption experience. The more sophisticated the consumer becomes, the more evolved the products on the shelves (and their marketing) will become.

As cannabis legalization marches forward, the market for products geared towards patients and consumers will rapidly expand. New companies and brands will jump in developing products to meet demand. Simultaneously, research will continue to move forward and more information regarding the benefits of the cannabis plant will come to light.

It’s up to consumers to better understand what they are looking for from their cannabis experience and from their products. By having open conversations with budtenders and asking brands for what they want, they open to door to new possibilities.

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Terpenes in CBD: What They Are, Benefits, & Effects

CBD oil is just one of the plethora of natural products containing terpenes.

In fact, you don’t need to be familiar with cannabis to consume terpenes — they are present in virtually any plant out there, including herbs, fruits, and vegetables.

Terpenes are a scientific name to describe aromatic compounds that we all interact with within our everyday lives.

For cannabis and terpenes, abundance and diversity are the names of the game.

But did you know that terpenes are more than just about aromas and flavors? They can also interact with THC and other cannabinoids to create a phenomenon known as the entourage effect.

Most of the time, terpenes are included in a CBD extract. Sometimes, however, hemp companies separate and reintroduce them to the end product to create different ratios and make a broad-spectrum product or enhance the efficacy of CBD distillates.

Wondering why terpenes are so important for CBD oil? Why are they suddenly on everyone’s tongue?

Below you’ll find the answer.

What Are Terpenes?

There are over 500 phytochemicals in cannabis, about 140 of which are known as terpenes.

Terpenes are highly volatile, aromatic compounds found in all plants — not only cannabis. However, as we’ve mentioned earlier, cannabis is particularly abundant in these molecules.

Terpenes are responsible for how these plants smell and taste. Every time you waft a fruit, herb, or vegetable, or when walking around the garden — you come into contact with terpenes.

Several hundreds of terpenes have been identified globally, and over 100 of them have been linked to hemp plants. However, only a few terpenes occur in hemp in concentrations significant enough to be important for our health.

The main reason why people have become interested in terpenes is the extra health benefits they come with. Researchers have been investigating their therapeutic potential for decades — concluding they have much to offer regarding our physiological and emotional well-being.

As a matter of fact, aromatherapy has been used for centuries due to its holistic, natural effects.

Are Terpenes the Same as Terpenoids?

You may often hear people using the words “terpenes” and “terpenoids” interchangeably — are they right?

The short answer: no.

Terpenes and terpenoids have slightly different chemical structures. Terpenes are found in living cannabis plants in their trichomes (hormonal glands) located on the surface of their flowers. Terpenoids start to form when you dry and cure the herb. These two processes change the molecular makeup of terpenes.

Terpenoids are commonly combined with other natural ingredients to create perfumes, essential oils, and spices. Researchers suggest that terpenoids can lower, increase, or change the potency and duration of the effects induced by cannabinoids aside from giving the buds their unique fragrances and flavors.

Simply put, the effects of CBD are modulated by terpenes; otherwise, they would be bland, and its benefits weakened.

Are Terpenes Safe?

Terpenes are generally considered safe. These organic substances can have a range of positive effects on our health. For instance, they can indirectly increase dopamine levels, positively affecting our mood; terpenes are also known for their stress-relieving and anti-inflammatory properties on top of being able to enhance the therapeutic properties of cannabis.

That being said, research has yet to confirm whether these therapeutic effects of terpenes are clinically significant. Some people can also be allergic to specific terpenes. Although these compounds don’t trigger allergies themselves, they can do it upon air exposure, so if your nose gets runny after interacting with certain aromas, it may indicate allergies.

The Most Abundant Terpenes in CBD Oil

Terpenes are known for providing cannabis plants with appealing aromas. Still, at the same time, they also contribute to the entourage effect, increasing the therapeutic potential of other CBD and other cannabinoids. That’s the primary reason why most people choose full-spectrum CBD over isolates. Full-spectrum CBD comes from the whole plant, reflecting its original phytochemical profile.

Here are the most abundant terpenes in CBD oil — with their health benefits explained.

Limonene

As you can guess by the name, limonene brings the fragrances of citrus fruits. It’s typically found in the zest o citruses, such as lemon, lime, and orange. Limonene has energizing, stress-relieving, and anti-fungal properties; medical researchers have also found it can act as an anti-irritant and improve cannabinoids and other terpenes .

Pinene

You can find pinene in pine needles as well as in a selection of citrus fruits. In Chinese folk medicine, terpene is an anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and bronchodilating agent.

Myrcene

Myrcene is another common terpene in cannabis. It has a pungent, earthy, and fruity fragrance. Despite being the smallest terpene, it can make it easier for cannabinoids to penetrate the brain-blood barrier — increasing their potency. It also acts as a muscle relaxant and can cause drowsiness in high doses. The scientific literature mentions myrcene as an antibacterial compound that can also reduce pain .

Linalool

If your cannabis strain has a floral smell, it’s probably high in linalool. This terpene is commonly found in chamomile and lavender. Hemp companies often use it in topical creams and ointments for its soothing scent and calming effects .

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Beta-Caryophyllene

You can find beta-caryophyllene in cloves, cinnamon, black pepper, and broccoli. It’s one of the most promising terpenes in terms of their therapeutic effects. It’s also known as “the dietary cannabinoid” because it can similarly interact with cannabinoid receptors to cannabinoids. This mechanism enables beta-caryophyllene to reduce pain and inflammation .

Bisabolol

Bisabolol is a fragrant terpene that offers calming effects. It is found mainly in chamomile, but it also occurs in high concentrations in a less popular plant — The candeia tree in Brazil. This terpene is widely used in the skincare space due to its anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties .

Terpineol

Terpineol smells similar to trees, lilacs, and lime blossoms; it is also present in many exotic fruits. This terpene is often used to infuse lotions and perfumes. Terpineol has potent anti-oxidative properties, according to scientists .

Trans-nerolidol

This terpene is underlined by notes of apples, roses, and citrus fruits. It commonly occurs in tea trees, lemongrass, and jasmine. Research suggests that trans-nerolidol demonstrates potent antifungal, antiparasitic, and sedative effects .

Benefits & Effects of Terpenes in CBD

Terpenes offer a wealth of health benefits on their own. However, they can also modulate the effects of cannabinoids, including CBD and THC. Humans have evolved to consume cannabinoids, and the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is soundproof that. Both cannabinoids and terpenes can interact with the receptors in the ECS to help the body maintain homeostasis — biochemical balance between all systems and organs.

This unique synergy between cannabinoids and terpenes is known as “the entourage effect” or “the ensemble effect.”

How Terpenes Contribute to the Entourage Effect

The entourage effect has been studied by scientists since its introduction in 1998, when Raphael Mechoulam, the father of cannabis research, discovered that whole-plant extracts could produce more pronounced therapeutic effects than every compound from these extracts used in isolation.

This concept was further elaborated on by Dr. Ethan Bud Russo, a neuroscientist, and cannabis expert, in his work “Taming THC: Cannabis Synergy and Phytocannabinoid-Terpenoid Interactions.”

The entourage effect assumes a unique relationship between cannabis, terpenes, and flavonoids in cannabis. When the said molecules are consumed in the form of dried flowers or as an oily extract, they enhance the efficacy of CBD and THC while mitigating potentially unwanted reactions.

The entourage effect isn’t unique to terpenes. For example, CBD is known to counteract the psychotropic potential of THC, which may prove useful for people who are sensitive to high doses of the latter. CBD can be used to balance the intoxication from THC, resulting in a more clear-headed sensation.

THC, in turn, can amplify the anti-inflammatory and relaxing effects of CBD when introduced even in small doses.

Simply put, whole buds and full-spectrum extracts are believed to work better than their broad-spectrum or isolate-based counterparts.

Another interesting study on this phenomenon found that cannabis strains with equal or higher ratios of CBD to THC can improve the plant’s therapeutic potential up to 4 times as much as THC alone .

The study’s authors concluded that taking twice the amount of a THC isolate had no impact on its therapeutic effects except that the high was dull and more trippy — triggering anxiety and paranoia more often than even the high-THC strains.

How to Use CBD Terpenes

Terpenes aren’t as appealing on their own due to their low potency. However, they can make a significant difference when added to a CBD product. They are usually infused into CBD oils to provide it with desired fragrances aside from modulating the effects of CBD and other cannabinoids.

Manufacturers add terpenes using a process known as fractional distillation. Here’s how they do it with CBD oils and vape pens.

Add Terpenes into CBD Oil

After CO2 extraction, the hemp extract contains all naturally occurring compounds in hemp. The product can be left unfiltered and sold as “raw CBD oil” or undergo fractional distillation. True to its name, this process isolates individual compounds and places them in different chambers to be reintroduced to the final product.

There are two reasons why hemp manufacturers go for fractional distillation. First, it helps them keep the amount of THC below the legal 0.3% threshold; the manufacturer can precisely infuse the amount of THC they’re looking for. Second, this process helps capture the more fragile terpenes that would otherwise degrade during decarboxylation and filtration. Once these steps have been taken care of, the manufacturer can reintroduce terpenes to the final formula.

CBD Vapes with Terpenes

Adding terpenes to CBD vapes is easier than doing the same with CBD oil; you can actually infuse your CBD vape liquid with terpenes at home. Just make sure that you have a high-quality CBD liquid, thinning agents such as vegetable glycerin and propylene glycol, and your favorite terpenes.

Experts say it’s best to use a 1% terpene solution to achieve the desired flavors and sweetness. The carriers should make the maximum of your solution; the second place is CBD, and then you can start adding terpenes.

Final Thoughts On Terpenes And Their Role in CBD Products

Researchers and phytopharmacologists interested in the health benefits of cannabis have been investigating the influence of terpenes on cannabis extracts for decades.

Terpenes are more than just aromatic molecules. In fact, they can considerably affect the therapeutic profile of your CBD oil. There’s still a lot to discover when it comes to the relationship between cannabinoids and terpenes. Still, these compounds are necessary if you want to experience the full benefits of cannabis.

That’s why you won’t find single-molecule herbs. They’re always accompanied by supportive ingredients like terpenes.

Which terpenes do you like the most in CBD oil? Do you prefer citrusy notes, or are you into floral and earthy hints?

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  2. Salehi, Bahare et al. “Therapeutic Potential of α- and β-Pinene: A Miracle Gift of Nature.” Biomolecules vol. 9,11 738. 14 Nov. 2019, doi:10.3390/biom9110738 (1)
  3. Jansen, C et al. “Myrcene and terpene regulation of TRPV1.” Channels (Austin, Tex.) vol. 13,1 (2019): 344-366. doi:10.1080/19336950.2019.1654347 (2)
  4. Buchbauer, G et al. “Aromatherapy: evidence for sedative effects of the essential oil of lavender after inhalation.” Zeitschrift fur Naturforschung. C, Journal of biosciences vol. 46,11-12 (1991): 1067-72. doi:10.1515/znc-1991-11-1223
  5. Gertsch, Jürg et al. “Beta-caryophyllene is a dietary cannabinoid.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America vol. 105,26 (2008): 9099-104. doi:10.1073/pnas.0803601105
  6. Maurya, Anil K et al. “α-(-)-bisabolol reduces pro-inflammatory cytokine production and ameliorates skin inflammation.” Current pharmaceutical biotechnology vol. 15,2 (2014): 173-81. doi:10.2174/1389201015666140528152946
  7. Zengin, Hatice, and Ayse H Baysal. “Antibacterial and antioxidant activity of essential oil terpenes against pathogenic and spoilage-forming bacteria and cell structure-activity relationships evaluated by SEM microscopy.” Molecules (Basel, Switzerland) vol. 19,11 17773-98. 3 Nov. 2014, doi:10.3390/molecules191117773 (3)
  8. Silva, Marcos P N et al. “Antischistosomal activity of the terpene nerolidol.” Molecules (Basel, Switzerland) vol. 19,3 3793-803. 24 Mar. 2014, doi:10.3390/molecules19033793
  9. Russo E. B. (2011). Taming THC: potential cannabis synergy and phytocannabinoid-terpenoid entourage effects. British journal of pharmacology , 163 (7), 1344–1364. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01238.x (4)
  10. Boggs, D. L., Nguyen, J. D., Morgenson, D., Taffe, M. A., & Ranganathan, M. (2018). Clinical and Preclinical Evidence for Functional Interactions of Cannabidiol and Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol. Neuropsychopharmacology: official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology , 43 (1), 142–154. https://doi.org/10.1038/npp.2017.209 (5)
Nina Julia

Nina created CFAH.org following the birth of her second child. She was a science and math teacher for 6 years prior to becoming a parent — teaching in schools in White Plains, New York and later in Paterson, New Jersey.

Green Roads CBD Terpenes

Green Roads CBD terpenes are broad-spectrum extracts, meaning they are CBD isolates with added terpenes. This is a great middle-ground between full-spectrum and isolate extracts, and Green Roads has an impressive lineup compared with the competition. However, the high prices, especially for the single-serving syringes, make it hard to justify purchasing these products.

Price/Value 2/5

The overall outright cost and the cost per mg of CBD for the 100 mg and 300 mg terpene oil is pretty reasonable for the quality – the Daily Dose product is, unfortunately, leans a little too close to the expensive side and should be used only when you’re really in need of a CBD dose.

CBD Potency 2/5

The products in the Green Roads CBD terpenes lineup vary in potency, containing either roughly 6 to 7 mg of CBD per mL or 20 mg of CBD per mL. This might work well for beginners or intermediates, but experienced users who require high doses may find these products unsuitable.

Hemp Source 3/5

All Green Roads CBD products are extracted from high-quality hemp grown in the US. Although the company doesn’t use certified organic hemp or claim that the growing methods used are organic, it does provide detailed third-party lab test results for each product.

Purpose/Uses 4/5

Green Roads doesn’t list any specific uses for these products due to restrictions put in place by the United States Food and Drug Administration. However, CBD terpenes may be great for a variety of health conditions and symptoms, including pain, inflammation, stress, anxiety, and seizures.

Product Variations 4/5

The 15 mL bottles of Green Roads CBD terpenes oil come in a total of six flavors and two concentrations (100 mg and 300 mg), and there is also a 1 mL daily dose syringe product that contains 7 mg of CBD (three flavors available). Many suppliers don’t offer any CBD terpenes products at all, so this is a great selection.

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Formulation/Ingredients 4/5

We like the formula of this product when it comes to flavor — but this formula doesn’t offer much improvement to the overall effects of the product.

The added terpenes are meant to mimic the flavor and aroma of popular cannabis strains like Strawberry AK, Sour Diesel, Blueberry OG, and more.

Product Variants

Green Roads
Green Roads CBD Terpenes
15 mL

3.17 / 5

Total CBD : 100 mg
Potency : 7 mg/mL
Cost per mg CBD : $0.27
Extract Type : Broad-Spectrum
Green Roads
Green Roads CBD Terpenes
15 mL

3.17 / 5

Total CBD : 300 mg
Potency : 20 mg/mL
Cost per mg CBD : $0.18
Extract Type : Broad-Spectrum
Green Roads
Green Roads CBD Terpenes
1 mL

3.17 / 5

Total CBD : 7 mg
Potency : 7 mg/mL
Cost per mg CBD : $0.71
Extract Type : Broad-Spectrum
Table of Contents

Green Roads CBD Terpenes Review

Article By

For people that are new to the industry, CBD is a chemical compound extracted from cannabis plants that may offer several health benefits. However, unlike its more famous relative, THC, CBD doesn’t get the user “high.”

Terpenes give different strains of cannabis their unique flavors and aromas. Additionally, they can contribute to the entourage effect, which may help CBD do its job more effectively.

Green Roads CBD terpenes are broad-spectrum extracts, meaning they are CBD isolates with added terpenes. This is a great middle-ground between full-spectrum and isolate extracts, and Green Roads has an impressive lineup compared with the competition.

This review will help you decide if they are the right products for you.

Overview: CBD Terpenes

There are multiple Green Roads CBD terpenes products to choose from. The bottles of CBD terpenes oil are 15 mL and come with a 1 mL dropper that is marked so you can easily see how much you’re taking. There are two concentrations available: 100 mg and 300 mg of CBD.

Green Roads also sells 1 mL daily dose syringes that contain 7 mg of CBD. These make it easy to take your CBD on the go.

The 100 mg and 300 mg CBD terpenes oils come in the following flavors:

The 1 mL daily dose syringe comes in the following flavors:

Green Roads recommends using between 0.5 mL to 1 mL sublingually (under your tongue). However, you can always use more if you require a higher dose.

You can purchase the 100 mg CBD terpenes oil for $26.50, the 300 mg terpenes oil for $53.95, and the daily dose syringes for $5.00 each.

Pros & Cons

  • The CBD terpenes oil comes in six flavors and two concentrations
  • The daily dose syringe product makes it easy to take CBD on the go
  • You can take advantage of the entourage effect
  • Made with high-quality hemp
  • Small bottle size
  • Price per mg of CBD is expensive

Key Features and Benefits

1. Several Flavors and Concentrations

The 15 mL bottles of Green Roads CBD terpenes oil come in a total of six flavors and two concentrations: 100 mg and 300 mg of CBD. There is also a 1 mL daily dose syringe product that contains 7 mg of CBD, which is available in three flavors. Many suppliers don’t offer any CBD terpenes products at all, so this is a great selection.

2. Take Advantage of the Entourage Effect

The entourage effect has been shown to increase the benefits of CBD. Also, by combining CBD with terpenes, you get more complex and interesting natural flavors and aromas.

3. Made with High-Quality Hemp

All Green Roads CBD terpenes are made using an excellent hemp source in the US. Although the company doesn’t use certified organic hemp or claim that the growing methods used are organic, it does provide detailed third-party lab test results for each product, so you can make your purchase with confidence.

Who Should Consider Using CBD Terpenes?

This is a good product for customers who are looking for a third-party-tested CBD terpenes oil made from high-quality hemp. If you’re willing to spend the extra money, terpenes can add a lot of value to your CBD oil.

Price/Value

Overall, Green Roads CBD terpenes are more expensive than typical CBD oils. However, you may get some extra benefits from the added terpenes.

Cost Breakdown of Green Roads CBD Terpenes
Product Name Total CBD Total Cost Cost Per mg CBD
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Sour Diesel) – 100 mg 100 mg $26.50 $0.27
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Original Nectar) – 100 mg 100 mg $26.50 $0.27
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Tange OG) – 300 mg 300 mg $53.95 $0.18
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Strawberry AK) – 100 mg 100 mg $26.50 $0.27
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Strawberry AK) – 300 mg 300 mg $53.95 $0.18
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Pineapple Express) – 100 mg 100 mg $26.50 $0.27
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Pineapple Express) – 300 mg 300 mg $53.95 $0.18
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Blueberry OG) – 100 mg 100 mg $26.50 $0.27
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Blueberry OG) – 300 mg 300 mg $53.95 $0.18
Green Roads CBD Daily Dose Terps (Strawberry AK) – 7 mg 7 mg $5.00 $0.71
Green Roads CBD Daily Dose Terps (Pineapple Express) – 7 mg 7 mg $5.00 $0.71
Green Roads CBD Daily Dose Terps (Blueberry OG) – 7 mg 7 mg $5.00 $0.71

CBD Potency

Green Roads CBD terpenes are low to mid potency. Containing just 7 mg of CBD per mL, the 100 mg oil and the daily dose syringes may be good for new users or those who require small doses of CBD. The 300 mg oil, however, contains 20 mg of CBD per mL, which sits somewhere around the middle of the potency spectrum. This product might be good for intermediate to advanced CBD users, but it still probably won’t be sufficient for those who require high doses.

Potency Breakdown of Green Roads CBD Terpenes
Product Name Total CBD Total Volume CBD Potency
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Sour Diesel) – 100 mg 100 mg 15 mL 6.66 mg/mL
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Original Nectar) – 100 mg 100 mg 15 mL 6.66 mg/mL
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Tange OG) – 300 mg 300 mg 15 mL 20 mg/mL
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Strawberry AK) – 100 mg 100 mg 15 mL 6.66 mg/mL
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Strawberry AK) – 300 mg 300 mg 15 mL 20 mg/mL
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Pineapple Express) – 100 mg 100 mg 15 mL 6.66 mg/mL
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Pineapple Express) – 300 mg 300 mg 15 mL 20 mg/mL
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Blueberry OG) – 100 mg 100 mg 15 mL 6.66 mg/mL
Green Roads CBD Terpenes Oil (Blueberry OG) – 300 mg 300 mg 15 mL 20 mg/mL
Green Roads CBD Daily Dose Terps (Strawberry AK) – 7 mg 7 mg 1 mL 7 mg/mL
Green Roads CBD Daily Dose Terps (Pineapple Express) – 7 mg 7 mg 1 mL 7 mg/mL
Green Roads CBD Daily Dose Terps (Blueberry OG) – 7 mg 7 mg 1 mL 7 mg/mL

Hemp Source

Green Roads sources all its hemp from the US. Although the company doesn’t use certified organic hemp or claim that the growing methods used are organic, it does provide detailed third-party lab test results for each product.

Purpose/Uses

CBD terpenes may be great for a variety of health conditions and symptoms, including pain, inflammation, stress, anxiety, and seizures. Unfortunately, Green Roads doesn’t list specific uses due to laws in place from the Food and Drug Administration that restrict the health claims that companies can make about CBD.

Product Variations/Flavors

Green Roads has a great selection of CBD terpenes products. The 15 mL bottles of CBD terpenes oil come in a total of six flavors and two concentrations: 100 mg and 300 mg of CBD. There is also a 1 mL daily dose syringe product that contains 7 mg of CBD, which is available in three flavors.

Final Verdict: Probably Worth the High Price if You Require a Low Dose

Overall, Green Roads is a good company with a great CBD terpenes lineup, and its products are of high quality — but they are too expensive for my liking.

At $0.18 and $0.27 per mg of CBD for the 100 mg and 300 mg, respectively, this price isn’t all that unreasonable for a high-quality product. However, the CBD Daily Dose per mg of CBD is a little on the steep side and should only be used sparingly.

As a more experienced CBD user, I chose the 300 mg oil. It worked well for reducing my stress and helping me relax at the end of the day, and it also made falling asleep easier. However, the 15 mL bottle size is too small, in my opinion. I had to use a full mL or more to get the dose I needed, so I finished the bottle quickly.

In conclusion, if you only require low doses of CBD and you’re willing to spend the extra money, Green Roads CBD terpenes products may be a good choice. They’re made with a high-quality hemp source and come with recent third-party lab test results, so you can purchase with confidence. However, you’ll likely be able to find a similar product for less.

If you need high doses of CBD, on the other hand, you may have to look elsewhere for a suitable CBD terpenes product.